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The Dark Tower


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#1 tabes

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 11:48 AM

This is going to be quite the ambitious project.

http://www.deadline....-tv-adaptation/
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#2 metzol

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 05:22 PM

I heard that there's one big book with all seven volumes available. Is this true? I think I want to read it. I read the first two books when they came out twenty years ago and then abandoned the series so I would like to jump back in.
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#3 goldglv17

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 09:54 PM

I heard that there's one big book with all seven volumes available. Is this true? I think I want to read it. I read the first two books when they came out twenty years ago and then abandoned the series so I would like to jump back in.



If that is true I want it! As much as I have loved King's works I have never read a single word of this series, maybe it seemed too daunting of a task for me.
:(



I still have no idea what's going on....


#4 Nigel'sStillConfused

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 11:32 AM

I don't think there is one master volume of all 7 books. You would need a fleet of Ryder trucks to shlep it around for you. Wolves of the Calla alone has to be at least 800 pages long.

This is interesting - no doubt a TV series format is appropriate, and probably neccessary, to even have a chance of pulling it off. They are going to need to do some radical revisions to the works, and I have no idea how they are going to try and handle the "4th wall" elements of the books which are very important to them (it is not giving anything away to state that Stephen King himself is a key figure in some of the books.). In addition, the Dark Tower universe references many other King works (as much more than an insider joke) and many critical elements of the saga are actually in works other than the 7 DT books (The Stand, Salem's Lot, Insomnia, and Rose Madder, and several short stories being notable and vital ones). I haven't read the comic book adaptations so I don't know if perhaps they've already managed that aspect somewhat already.

I think it can be done, though, as long as the writers and directors commit to being aggressive in their adaptation and shrugging off the concerns of hardcore fans who insist that everything in the books has to be adapted to the letter. Lord of the Rings is a much easier epic work to adapt because it is straightforward and self-contained. Here I think its going to be much trickier. I doubt it needs to be as off the wall as the film "ADAPTATION" (which was adapted fron Susan Orlean's New Yorker article "The Orchid Thief" and goes wildly afield), but it will certainly require some hard choices that are bound to leave some purists unhappy.

I love the books, but am fine with something that takes it in a different direction if it retains the overall theme, plot, and mood - I think film adaptations need to stand on their own two legs rather than just slavishly adhere to the original book.
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#5 metzol

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Posted 14 July 2011 - 04:46 PM

This is going to be quite the ambitious project.

http://www.deadline....-tv-adaptation/

Just finished the last book and loved it. Let's see how this project pans out. Timothy Olyphant is my choice for Roland. Though maybe Viggo Mortensen would be better.
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#6 Nigel'sStillConfused

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 09:48 AM

Just finished the last book and loved it. Let's see how this project pans out. Timothy Olyphant is my choice for Roland. Though maybe Viggo Mortensen would be better.



Those are good picks (though I think Olyphant would probably just dupe his Justified or Deadwood characters.) I'd heard Javier Bardem's name floating around alot - he would be good. Roland Deschain is a very troubled character and you need someone not just with an edge, but an ability to genuinely but carefully moderate the emotional elements of the story. (Mortenson can do that as well - A History of Violence demonstrates that perfectly - I just think he may be too well known at this point and viewers may channel LOTR when they see him in this role.

Meanwhile, whether this project ever gets off the ground is doubtful. See link. http://nymag.com/dai...tower_rush.html Personally, I agree with the comment that, at least from a movie standpoint, there may be one good film in the DT opus, but trying to adapt the whole shebang may lead to some bad films. That's a distinct risk here given the 4th wall elements that are very significant to the story. I think Wizard & Glass is very self-contained and will work as a film. I have greater misgivings about books like Song of Susannah and Wolves of the Calla (esp because while I love Wolves, it inherently requires an understanding of Salem's Lot).
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#7 metzol

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 08:04 AM

Those are good picks (though I think Olyphant would probably just dupe his Justified or Deadwood characters.) I'd heard Javier Bardem's name floating around alot - he would be good. Roland Deschain is a very troubled character and you need someone not just with an edge, but an ability to genuinely but carefully moderate the emotional elements of the story. (Mortenson can do that as well - A History of Violence demonstrates that perfectly - I just think he may be too well known at this point and viewers may channel LOTR when they see him in this role.

Meanwhile, whether this project ever gets off the ground is doubtful. See link. http://nymag.com/dai...tower_rush.html Personally, I agree with the comment that, at least from a movie standpoint, there may be one good film in the DT opus, but trying to adapt the whole shebang may lead to some bad films. That's a distinct risk here given the 4th wall elements that are very significant to the story. I think Wizard & Glass is very self-contained and will work as a film. I have greater misgivings about books like Song of Susannah and Wolves of the Calla (esp because while I love Wolves, it inherently requires an understanding of Salem's Lot).

In hindsight I agree about the casting choices. Olyphant can play a younger Roland but he doesn't have the weariness of the later Roland. And Viggo is too obvious.

What did you think about the ending, the real ending, the Coda? At first I thought King just couldn't leave well enough alone and then I was glad he added it. I was blown away by it. It was so fitting on many levels.
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#8 Nigel'sStillConfused

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 05:04 PM

In hindsight I agree about the casting choices. Olyphant can play a younger Roland but he doesn't have the weariness of the later Roland. And Viggo is too obvious.

What did you think about the ending, the real ending, the Coda? At first I thought King just couldn't leave well enough alone and then I was glad he added it. I was blown away by it. It was so fitting on many levels.



I have to confess I was ambivalent about the coda. Here's why.
Spoiler


Meanwhile. I see that there is the possibility of yet another DT book next year (but chronology wise it's supposed to come between the end of Wizard & Glass and the beginning of Wolves of the Calla. http://www.stephenki...e/announcement/
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#9 metzol

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 05:17 AM

I have to confess I was ambivalent about the coda. Here's why.

Spoiler


Meanwhile. I see that there is the possibility of yet another DT book next year (but chronology wise it's supposed to come between the end of Wizard & Glass and the beginning of Wolves of the Calla. http://www.stephenki...e/announcement/

That's fair. Though, it is fitting that it had a deja vu feel given all the meta writing in the series. He was never subtle about the influences of stories such as The Lord of the Ring, The Wizard of Oz, as well as his own books. That was actually a major theme in the book, that stories have their own very real universe. Art not only imitates life, it is life.
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#10 Nigel'sStillConfused

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Posted 23 July 2011 - 08:40 PM

That's fair. Though, it is fitting that it had a deja vu feel given all the meta writing in the series. He was never subtle about the influences of stories such as The Lord of the Ring, The Wizard of Oz, as well as his own books. That was actually a major theme in the book, that stories have their own very real universe. Art not only imitates life, it is life.


True (which is why I think its more accurate for me to say that I'm ambivalent rather than disappointed by it.)

And I agree with you on the meta writing and the influences. But I'd argue that Tolkien also had obvious influences in his story (about a zillion years of mythology) yet ended with what was (for me) a resounding and deeply satisfying concluding to LOTR that I didn't get out of the coda.

It may not be a fair comparison - Tolkien was essentially trying to single handedly create am epic like Iliad/Odyessey AND create all the mythology that underscored it, whereas DT doesn't attempt that (at least not to same degree, including its language. King never forgot he was trying to channel the classic Western). But because both are plainly following the framework of "the hero's quest" mythology I couldn't help but draw comparisons.

I still fear that trying to import this over to a film or TV medium is going to be problematic. The meta aspect of the story is pretty vital - truthfully I think the screenwriter may have to make some tough choices on what to jettison rather than wrestle with adapting certain aspects and themes of DT that are specific not just to art in general, but literature and books in particular.
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